Nov 24 2017

Treasure Hunter Discovers Rare 2 000 Year Old Roman Coins


Nov 24 2017

Ancient Roman Coins


Nov 24 2017

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring

Men’s Roman Coin Ring crafted with Sterling Silver and 10kt gold featuring an Authentic Roman Coin designed by Anna-JDesign. The Roman coin is from Thrace Traianopolis with the image of a aesculapius serpent and rod (Rod of Aesculapius) The classical symbol of human medicine. Hand Made using Ancient Techniques creating a Unique Piece with industrial marks bringing out the Unique Crafting. A great ring for someone in the medical profession or anyone else who enjoys ancient history. Weight – 17.7 g. The item “Mens Ancient Roman Coin Aesculapius Serpent Silver&Gold Doctors Medical Ring” is in sale since Wednesday, November 08, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “texascoinexchange” and is located in Jefferson, Texas. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, all countries in continental Asia, Australia.
  • Composition: Silver

Nov 23 2017

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin

Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after! It is a must have for every collection. Rare Denarius 114 or 113 BC, AR 19mm. ROMA Laureate, diademed and draped bust of Roma r. Equestrian statue on triumphal arch; between the arches, L E P. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (120 BC 77 BC) was a Roman statesman. After the death of Sulla, he attempted to undermine the Sullan constitution and revive the populares faction. His forces were defeated in a battle on the Campus Martius. He was the father of the triumvir Marcus Aemilius Lepidus a Roman patrician who was triumvir with Octavian (the future Augustus) and Mark Antony, and the last Pontifex Maximus of the Roman Republic. Lepidus had previously been a close ally of Julius Caesar. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Republic Silver Coin” is in sale since Tuesday, November 21, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Composition: Silver
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Date: 114-113 BC
  • Ruler:: Marcus Aemilius Lepidus

Nov 23 2017

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after! It is a must have for every collection. IMP CAE M AVR ANT AVG P TR P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / MINER VICTRIX, Minerva standing left, holding crowning Victory and spear; trophy to right. 3.39g, 18mm, 1h. 4 April 188 8 April 217, formally. Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus. From AD 198 to 217. A member of the Severan Dynasty. He was the eldest son of Septimius Severus. Caracalla reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus’ death in 211. Caracalla then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta. With whom he had a fraught relationship, until he had Geta murdered later that year. Caracalla’s reign was marked by domestic instability and external invasions from the Germanic people. Caracalla is presented in ancient sources as a tyrant and cruel leader, an image that has survived into modernity. Present Caracalla as a soldier first and emperor second. In the 12th century, Geoffrey of Monmouth. Started the legend of Caracalla’s role as the king of Britain. Later, in the 18th century, Caracalla’s memory was revived in the works of French artists due to the parallels between Caracalla’s apparent tyranny and that of King Louis XVI. Modern works continue to portray Caracalla as a psychopathic and evil ruler. His rule is remembered as being one of the most tyrannical of all Roman emperors. Caracalla’s reign was notable for the Antonine Constitution. , also known as the Edict of Caracalla , which granted Roman citizenship. To nearly all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. The edict gave all the enfranchised men Caracalla’s adopted praenomen. Domestically, Caracalla was known for the construction of the Baths of Caracalla. Which became the second largest baths in Rome, for the introduction of a new Roman currency named the antoninianus. A sort of double denarius, and for the massacres he enacted against the people of Rome and elsewhere in the empire. Towards the end of his rule, Caracalla began a campaign against the Parthian Empire. He did not see this campaign through to completion due to his assassination by a disaffected soldier in 217. He was succeeded as emperor by Macrinus. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Caracalla. Rare Denarius circa 198 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Thursday, November 16, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, Sweden, Indonesia, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Singapore, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Dominican republic, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, El salvador, Honduras, Jamaica.
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Ruler: Caracalla
  • Composition: Silver
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Date: 198 AD
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable

Nov 23 2017

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Exquisite Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after. It will make a great addition to ones collection. Marcus Aurelius as Caesar 139-161 AD. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F, bare head of Marcus Aurelius right / TR POT II COS II, Minerva standing right, holding inverted spear and grounded shield. (/rilis/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus; 26 April 121 17 March 180 AD) was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus’ death in 169. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the so-called Five Good Emperors. He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his untitled writing, commonly known as the Meditations, is the most significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. Marcus Aurelius was father to Commodus on of Romes most prolific rulers under Nero and Julius Ceaser. During his reign, the Empire defeated a revitalized Parthian Empire in the East: Aurelius’ general Avidius Cassius sacked the capital Ctesiphon in 164 AD. In central Europe, Aurelius fought the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmatians with success during the Marcomannic Wars, although the threat of the Germanic tribes began to represent a troubling reality for the Empire. A revolt in the East led by Avidius Cassius failed to gain momentum and was suppressed immediately. Aurelius’ Meditations, written in Greek while on campaign between 170 and 180 AD, is still revered as a literary monument to a philosophy of service and duty, describing how to find and preserve equanimity in the midst of conflict by following nature as a source of guidance and inspiration. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Marcus Aurelius. Denarius. Father to Commodus. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Friday, November 17, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Ruler: Marcus Aurelius
  • Composition: Silver
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Date: 139-161 AD
  • Era: Roman: Imperial

Nov 22 2017

GORDIAN III 242AD Rome Authentic Original Ancient Silver Roman Coin i63325

GORDIAN III 242AD Rome Authentic Original Ancient Silver Roman Coin i63325

GORDIAN III 242AD Rome Authentic Original Ancient Silver Roman Coin i63325

Item: i63325 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Silver Antoninianus 22mm (3.54 grams) Rome mint 242-244 A. Reference: RIC 216, C 319 IMPGORDIANVSPIVSFELAVG – Radiate, cuirassed bust right. SAECVLIFELICITAS – Gordian III standing right, holding spear and globe. Ruling dynasties often exploit pomp and ceremony with the use of regalia: crowns, robes, orb (globe) and scepters. Gordian III (Latin: Marcus Antonius Gordianus Pius Augustus ; 20 January 225 AD – 11 February 244 AD) was Roman Emperor from 238 AD to 244 AD. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. Antonia Gordiana was the daughter of Emperor Gordian I and younger sister of Emperor Gordian II. Very little is known of his early life before his acclamation. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238 AD. In 235, following the murder of Emperor Alexander Severus in Moguntiacum (modern Mainz), the capital of the Roman province Germania Superior, Maximinus Thrax was acclaimed Emperor. In the following years, there was a growing opposition against Maximinus in the Roman senate and amongst the majority of the population of Rome. In 238 a rebellion broke out in the Africa Province, where Gordian’s grandfather and uncle, Gordian I and II, were proclaimed joint emperors. This revolt was suppressed within a month by Cappellianus, governor of Numidia and a loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax. The elder Gordians died, but public opinion cherished their memory as peace-loving and literate men, victims of Maximinus’ oppression. Meanwhile, Maximinus was on the verge of marching on Rome and the Senate elected Pupienus and Balbinus as joint emperors. These senators were not popular men and the population of Rome was still shocked by the elder Gordian’s fate, so the Senate decided to take the teenager Gordian, rename him Marcus Antonius Gordianus like his grandfather, and raise him to the rank of Caesar and imperial heir. Pupienus and Balbinus defeated Maximinus, mainly due to the defection of several legions, particularly the II Parthica , who assassinated Maximinus. However, their joint reign was doomed from the start with popular riots, military discontent and an enormous fire that consumed Rome in June 238. On July 29, Pupienus and Balbinus were killed by the Praetorian Guard and Gordian proclaimed sole emperor. Due to Gordian’s age, the imperial government was surrendered to the aristocratic families, who controlled the affairs of Rome through the Senate. In 240, Sabinianus revolted in the African province, but the situation was quickly brought under control. In 241, Gordian was married to Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, daughter of the newly appointed praetorian prefect, Timesitheus. As chief of the Praetorian Guard and father in law of the Emperor, Timesitheus quickly became the de facto ruler of the Roman Empire. In the 3rd century, the Roman frontiers weakened against the Germanic tribes across the Rhine and Danube, and the Sassanid Empire across the Euphrates increased its own attacks. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243). The campaign was a success and Gordian, who had joined the army, was planning an invasion of the enemy’s territory, when his father-in-law died in unclear circumstances. Without Timesitheus, the campaign, and the Emperor’s security, were at risk. Gaius Julius Priscus and, later on, his own brother Marcus Julius Philippus, also known as Philip the Arab, stepped in at this moment as the new Praetorian Prefects and the campaign proceeded. Around February 244, the Persians fought back fiercely to halt the Roman advance to Ctesiphon. Persian sources claim that a battle occurred (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. Roman sources do not mention this battle and suggest that Gordian died far away from Misiche, at Zaitha (Qalat es Salihiyah) in northern Mesopotamia. Modern scholarship does not unanimously accept this course of the events. One view holds that Gordian died at Zaitha, murdered by his frustrated army, while the role of Philip is unknown. Other scholars, such as Kettenhofen, Hartman and Winter have concluded that Gordian died in battle against the Sassanids. Philip transferred the body of the deceased emperor to Rome and arranged for his deication. Gordian’s youth and good nature, along with the deaths of his grandfather and uncle and his own tragic fate at the hands of the enemy, earned him the lasting esteem of the Romans. The soldiers held Gordian in high esteem, as he had possibly sacrificed his life to save them in 244. World-renowned expert numismatist, enthusiast, author and dealer in authentic ancient Greek, ancient Roman, ancient Byzantine, world coins & more. Ilya Zlobin is an independent individual who has a passion for coin collecting, research and understanding the importance of the historical context and significance all coins and objects represent. Send me a message about this and I can update your invoice should you want this method. Getting your order to you, quickly and securely is a top priority and is taken seriously here. Great care is taken in packaging and mailing every item securely and quickly. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be very happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Additionally, the coin is inside it’s own protective coin flip (holder), with a 2×2 inch description of the coin matching the individual number on the COA. Whether your goal is to collect or give the item as a gift, coins presented like this could be more prized and valued higher than items that were not given such care and attention to. When should I leave feedback? Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens sometimes that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for their order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. How and where do I learn more about collecting ancient coins? Visit the Guide on How to Use My Store. For on an overview about using my store, with additional information and links to all other parts of my store which may include educational information on topics you are looking for. The item “GORDIAN III 242AD Rome Authentic Original Ancient Silver Roman Coin i63325″ is in sale since Saturday, August 12, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Gordian III
  • Composition: Silver

Nov 22 2017

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin

As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after. It will make a great addition to ones collection. Hadrian, 117-138 As circa 132-134, Rome Mint, 25.5mm. Bare-headed and draped bust right, HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS. Holding patera and sceptre, CLEMENTIA AVG COS III P P SC. Hadrian (/hedrin/; Latin: Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus; 24 January 76 10 July 138) was Roman emperor from 117 to 138. He is known for building Hadrian’s Wall, which marked the northern limit of Britannia. He also rebuilt the Pantheon, constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma, and may have rebuilt the Serapeum of Alexandria. Philhellene in most of his tastes, he is considered by some to have been a humanist. Hadrian was born Publius Aelius Hadrianus into a Hispano-Roman family. Although Italica near Santiponce (in modern-day Spain) is often considered his birthplace, his actual place of birth remains uncertain. It is generally accepted that he came from a family with centuries-old roots in Hispania. His predecessor, Trajan, was a maternal cousin of Hadrian’s father. Trajan did not designate an heir officially, but according to his wife Pompeia Plotina, he named Hadrian emperor immediately before his death. Trajan’s wife and his friend Licinius Sura were well disposed towards Hadrian, and he may well have owed his succession to them. During his reign, Hadrian travelled to nearly every province of the Empire. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He used his relationship with his Greek lover Antinous to underline his philhellenism, and this led to the establishment of one of the most popular cults of ancient times. Hadrian spent a great deal of time with the military; he usually wore military attire and even dined and slept among the soldiers. He ordered rigorous military training and drilling and made use of false reports of attacks to keep the army on alert. On his accession to the throne, Hadrian withdrew from Trajan’s conquests in Mesopotamia, Assyria and Armenia, and even considered abandoning Dacia. Late in his reign he suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina. In 138 Hadrian adopted Antoninus Pius on the condition that he adopt Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus as his own heirs. They would eventually succeed Antoninus as co-emperors. Hadrian died the same year at Baiae. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Hadrian. As circa 132-134 AD. Ancient Roman Bronze Coin” is in sale since Monday, November 20, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Denomination: As
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Grade: Green Patina. High Grade
  • Ruler: Hadrian
  • Date: 132-134 AD

Nov 22 2017

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after. It will make a great addition to ones collection. Maximinus I, 235-238 AD Denarius circa 235-236 AD, Rome Mint, 20mm. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. Victoria advancing r, holding palm-branch and wreath, VICTORIA AVG. Maximinus Thrax Latin: Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus Augustus; c. 173 May 238, also known as Maximinus I, was Roman Emperor from 235 to 238. Most likely Maximinus was of Thraco-Roman origin (believed so by Herodian in his writings). According to the notoriously unreliable Augustan History (Historia Augusta), he was born in Thrace or Moesia to a Gothic father and an Alanic mother, an Iranian people of the Scythian-Sarmatian branch; however, the supposed parentage is highly unlikely, as the presence of the Goths in the Danubian area is first attested after the beginning of the Crisis of the Third Century. British historian Ronald Syme, writing that “the word’Gothia’ should have sufficed for condemnation” of the passage in the Augustan History, felt that the burden of evidence from Herodian, Syncellus and elsewhere pointed to Maximinus having been born in Moesia. The references to his “Gothic” ancestry might refer to a Thracian Getae origin (the two populations were often confused by later writers, most notably by Jordanes in his Getica), as suggested by the paragraphs describing how “he was singularly beloved by the Getae, moreover, as if he were one of themselves” and how he spoke “almost pure Thracian”. His background was, in any case, that of a provincial of low birth, and was seen by the Senate as a barbarian, not even a true Roman, despite Caracallas edict granting citizenship to all freeborn inhabitants of the Empire. In many ways, Maximinus was similar to the later Thraco-Roman emperors of the 3rd-5th century Licinius, Galerius, Aureolus, Leo the Thracian, etc. , elevating themselves, via a military career, from the condition of a common soldier in one of the Roman legions to the foremost positions of political power. He joined the army during the reign of Septimius Severus, but did not rise to a powerful position until promoted by Alexander Severus. Maximinus was in command of Legio IV Italica, composed of recruits from Pannonia, who were angered by Alexander’s payments to the Alemanni and his avoidance of war. The troops, among whom included the Legio XXII Primigenia, elected the stern Maximinus, killing young Alexander and his mother at Moguntiacum (modern Mainz). The Praetorian Guard acclaimed him emperor, and their choice was grudgingly confirmed by the Senate, who were displeased to have a peasant as emperor. His son Maximus became caesar. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Maximinus Thrax. Stunning Denarius circa 235-236 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Monday, November 20, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Composition: Silver
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Date: 235-236 AD
  • Ruler: Maximinus Thrax

Nov 21 2017

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after! It is a must have for every collection. Septimius Severus, 193-211 AD, Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD, AR 20mm. Holding wreath and branch. RIC 125a and 503a. Septimius Severus (/svrs/; Latin: Lucius Septimius Severus Augustus; 11 April 145 4 February 211), also known as Severus, was Roman emperor from 193 to 211. Severus was born in Leptis Magna in the Roman province of Africa. As a young man he advanced through the cursus honorumthe customary succession of officesunder the reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Commodus. Severus seized power after the death of Emperor Pertinax in 193 during the Year of the Five Emperors. After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus, Severus fought his rival claimants, the generals Pescennius Niger and Clodius Albinus. Niger was defeated in 194 at the Battle of Issus in Cilicia. Later that year Severus waged a short punitive campaign beyond the eastern frontier, annexing the Kingdom of Osroene as a new province. Severus defeated Albinus three years later at the Battle of Lugdunum in Gaul. After consolidating his rule over the western provinces, Severus waged another brief, more successful war in the east against the Parthian Empire, sacking their capital Ctesiphon in 197 and expanding the eastern frontier to the Tigris. Furthermore, he enlarged and fortified the Limes Arabicus in Arabia Petraea. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian’s Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. In 208 he invaded Caledonia (modern Scotland), but his ambitions were cut short when he fell fatally ill in late 210. The Roman Empire reached its greatest extent under his reign, encompassing an area of 2 million square miles(5.18 million square kilometers). Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta. With the succession of his sons, Severus founded the Severan dynasty, the last dynasty of the empire before the Crisis of the Third Century. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Septimius Severus. Rare Denarius circa 198-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Saturday, November 18, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Grade: Beautiful Iridescent Tone. High Grade
  • Composition: Silver
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Ruler: Septimius Severus
  • Date: 198-202 AD