Oct 6 2017

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after! It is a must have for every collection. Geta Caesar, 198209 AD Denarius circa 200-202 AD, AR 19mm. Bare-headed and draped bust r. 7 March 189 -26 December 211. Who ruled with his father. And his older brother. From 209, when he was named. Like his brother who had held the title since 198. Severus died in 211, and although he intended for his sons to rule together, they proved incapable of sharing power culminating with the murder of Geta in December of that year. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Geta Caesar. Denarius circa 200-202 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Wednesday, October 04, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Composition: Silver
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Ruler: Geta
  • Date: 200-202 AD

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Oct 6 2017

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after! It is a must have for every collection. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony, autumn 32 – spring 31 BC. ANTAVG IIIVIRRPC, praetorian galley to right / Aquila between two signa; LEG VII across fields. Crawford 544/20; CRI 357; RSC 34; BMCRR East 198. 3.28g, 20mm, 6h. August 1, 30 BC, commonly known in English as. Politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the. Antony was a supporter of Julius Caesar. And served as one of his generals during the conquest of Gaul. And the Civil War. Antony was appointed administrator of Italy while Caesar eliminated political opponents in Greece, North Africa, and Spain. After Caesar’s death. In 44 BC, Antony joined forces with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Another of Caesar’s generals, and Octavian. Caesar’s nephew and adopted son, forming a three-man dictatorship known to historians as the Second Triumvirate. The Triumvirs defeated Caesar’s murderers, the Liberatores. At the Battle of Philippi. In 42 BC, and divided the government of the Republic between themselves. Antony was assigned Rome’s eastern provinces, including the client kingdom. Then ruled by Cleopatra VII Philopator. And was given the command in Rome’s war against Parthia. Relations among the Triumvirs were strained as the various members sought greater political power. Civil war between Antony and Octavian was averted in 40 BC, when Antony married Octavian’s sister, Octavia. Despite this marriage, Antony carried on a love affair with Cleopatra, who bore him three children, further straining Antony’s relations with Octavian. Lepidus was expelled from the association in 36 BC, and in 33 BC disagreements between Antony and Octavian caused a split between the remaining Triumvirs. Their ongoing hostility erupted into civil war. In 31 BC, as the Roman Senate. At Octavian’s direction, declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Later that year, Antony was defeated by Octavian’s forces at the Battle of Actium. Antony and Cleopatra fled to Egypt, where they committed suicide. With Antony dead, Octavian was the undisputed master of the Roman world. In 27 BC, Octavian was granted the title of Augustus. Marking the final stage in the transformation of the Roman Republic into an empire, with himself as the first Roman emperor. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Marc Antony Legionary. 32-31 BC. Rare Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Thursday, October 05, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Grade: High grade
  • Date: 32-31 BC
  • Composition: Silver
  • Ruler: Marc Antony
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman

Oct 6 2017

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin

Philip I 244-249 AD. Ancient Roman Silver Coin. This coin is a great find and highly sought after! It is a must have for every collection. Imperial – Philip I – Emperor Riding Antoninianus. Obv: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG legend with radiate, draped bust right. Rev: ADVENTVS AVGG legend with Philip on horseback left, holding sceptre and raising right hand. RIC 26b; RSC 3; Sear 8916. Philip’s rise to prominence began through the intervention of his brother Priscus, who was an important official under the emperor. His big break came in 243, during Gordian III’s campaign against. Of Persia, when the. Died under unclear circumstances. At the suggestion of his brother Priscus, Philip became the new Praetorian prefect, with the intention that the two brothers would control the young Emperor and rule the Roman world as unofficial regents. Following a military defeat, Gordian III died in 244 under circumstances that are still debated. While some claim that Philip conspired in his murder, other accounts (including one coming from the Persian point of view) state that Gordian died in battle. Whatever the case, Philip assumed the purple robe following Gordian’s death. His rise from so obscure a station to the first dignities of the empire seems to prove that he was a bold and able leader. But his boldness prompted him to aspire to the throne, and his abilities were employed to supplant, not to serve, his indulgent master. Philip was not willing to repeat the mistakes of previous claimants, and was aware that he had to return to Rome. In order to secure his position with the senate. However, his first priority was to conclude a peace treaty with Shapur I of Persia, and withdraw the army from a potentially disastrous situation. Although Philip was accused of abandoning territory, the actual terms of the peace were not as humiliating as they could have been. Philip apparently retained Timesitheus reconquest of Osroene. But he had to agree that Armenia. Lay within Persias sphere of influence. He also had to pay an enormous indemnity to the Persians of 500,000 gold denarii. Philip immediately issued coins proclaiming that he had made peace with the Persians (pax fundata cum Persis). Leading his army back up the Euphrates. Philip erected a cenotaph. In honor of Gordian III, but his ashes were sent ahead to Rome. Where he arranged for Gordian IIIs deification. He left his brother Priscus as extraordinary ruler of the Eastern provinces, with the title of rector Orientis. Moving westward, he gave his brother-in-law Severianus control of the provinces of Moesia. He eventually arrived in Rome in the late summer of 244, where he was confirmed Augustus. Before the end of the year, he nominated his young son Caesar. And heir, his wife, Otacilia Severa, was named Augusta, and he also deified his father Marinus, even though the latter had never been emperor. While in Rome, Philip also claimed an official victory over the Persians with the titles of Parthicus Adiabenicus , Persicus Maximus and Parthicus Maximus. International Buyers – Please Note. The item “Philip I 244-249 AD. Double-Denarius. Ancient Roman Silver Coin” is in sale since Wednesday, October 04, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Denomination: Double-Denarius
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Composition: Silver
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Ruler: Philip I
  • Date: 244-249 AD

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  • ancient roman philip 1 a d 244-249 price