Aug 19 2017

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin

This coin is a great find. It is a must have for every collection. High Grade Silvered Coin. Radiate (21mm, 4.35g, 12h). In imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle. R/ Sol driving facing quadriga, head l. Holding whip and extending hand; CM//XXIE. Probus (/probs/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius Probus Augustus; 19 August 232 September/October 282), was Roman Emperor from 276 to 282. Probus entered the army around 250 upon reaching adulthood. Appointed as a military tribune by the emperor Valerian, he later distinguished himself under the emperors Aurelian and Tacitus. He was appointed governor of the East by Tacitus, whose death in 276 prompted Probus’ soldiers to proclaim him emperor. Florianus, the half-brother of Tacitus, was also proclaimed successor by his soldiers, but he was killed after an indecisive campaign. Probus travelled west, defeating the Goths along the lower Danube in 277, and acquiring the title of Gothicus. His position as emperor was ratified by the Senate around this time. In 280281, Probus put down three usurpers, Julius Saturninus, Proculus and Bonosus. The extent of these revolts is not clear, but there are clues that they were not just local problems (an inscription with the name of Probus erased has been found as far as Spain). In 281, the emperor was in Rome, where he celebrated his triumph. Probus was eager to start his eastern campaign, delayed by the revolts in the west. He left Rome in 282, travelling first towards Sirmium, his birth city. Different accounts of Probus’s death exist. According to Joannes Zonaras, the commander of the Praetorian Guard Marcus Aurelius Carus had been proclaimed, more or less unwillingly, emperor by his troops. Probus sent some troops against the new usurper, but when those troops changed sides and supported Carus, Probus’ remaining soldiers assassinated him at Sirmium (September/October 282). According to other sources, however, Probus was killed by disgruntled soldiers, who rebelled against his orders to be employed for civic purposes, like draining marshes. Carus was proclaimed emperor after Probus’ death and avenged the murder of his predecessor. The item “Probus. Silvered Radiate. A. D. 276-282. Ancient Roman Coin” is in sale since Wednesday, August 16, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “ancientauctions” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Ruler: Probus
  • Denomination: Radiate
  • Certification: NGC Encapsulation Advisable
  • Composition: Silvered Bronze
  • Grade: High Grade
  • Date: A.D. 281