Nov 12 2017

GORDIAN III 238AD Ancient Roman Coin Hadrianopolis SERAPIS Cult TEMPLE i22245

GORDIAN III 238AD Ancient Roman Coin Hadrianopolis SERAPIS Cult TEMPLE i22245

GORDIAN III 238AD Ancient Roman Coin Hadrianopolis SERAPIS Cult TEMPLE i22245

Item: i22245 Authentic Ancient Roman Coin of. Gordian III – Roman Emperor: 238-244 A. Bronze 26mm (12.00 grams) of Hadrianopolis in Thrace AVT K M ANT OPIANOC AV , laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right. APIANOO E ITN, Tetrastyle temple with Serapis within. Serapis (Latin spelling, or Sarapis in Greek) was a syncretic Hellenistic – Egyptian god in Antiquity. His most renowned temple was the Serapeum of Alexandria. Under Ptolemy Soter , efforts were made to integrate Egyptian religion with that of their Hellenic rulers. Ptolemy’s policy was to find a deity that should win the reverence alike of both groups, despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of the previous foreign rulers i. E Set who was lauded by the Hyksos. Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but he was more prominent in Upper Egypt , and not as popular with those in Lower Egypt , where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so a Greek-style anthromorphic statue was chosen as the idol , and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi i. Osiris-Apis , which became Serapis , and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Edirne (ancient Hadrianopolis) is a city in Thrace , the westernmost part of Turkey , close to the borders with Greece and Bulgaria. Edirne served as the capital city of the Ottoman Empire from 1365 to 1457, when Constantinople (Istanbul) became the empire’s new capital. At present, Edirne is the capital of the Edirne Province in Turkish Thrace. The city’s estimated population in 2002 was 128,400, up from 119,298 in 2000. It has consulates of Bulgaria, Germany (Honorary), Greece, Romania (Honorary) and Slovakia (Honorary). Its sister cities are Haskovo and Yambol in Bulgaria and Alexandroupoli in Greece. The city was founded as Hadrianopolis , named for the Roman Emperor Hadrian. This name is still used in the Modern Greek. The English name Adrianople , by which the city was known until the Turkish Postal Service Law of 1930, has fallen into disuse. The Turkish Edirne , the Bulgarian (Odrin), and the Serbian (Jedrene) are adapted forms of the name Hadrianopolis. Marcus Antonius Gordianus Pius. , known in English as Gordian III , was Roman Emperor from 238 to 244. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and his father was an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. Antonia Gordiana was the daughter of Emperor Gordian I and younger sister of Emperor Gordian II. Very little is known on his early life before becoming Roman Emperor. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238. Following the murder of emperor Alexander Severus in Moguntiacum (modern Mainz), the capital of the Roman province Germania Inferior , Maximinus Thrax was acclaimed emperor, despite strong opposition of the Roman senate and the majority of the population. In response to what was considered in Rome as a rebellion, Gordian’s grandfather and uncle, Gordian I and II, were proclaimed joint emperors in the Africa Province. Their revolt was suppressed within a month by Cappellianus, governor of Numidia and a loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax. The elder Gordians died, but public opinion cherished their memory as peace loving and literate men, victims of Maximinus’ oppression. Meanwhile, Maximinus was on the verge of marching on Rome and the Senate elected Pupienus and Balbinus as joint emperors. These senators were not popular men and the population of Rome was still shocked by the elder Gordian’s fate, so that the Senate decided to take the teenager Gordian, rename him Marcus Antonius Gordianus as his grandfather, and raise him to the rank of Caesar and imperial heir. Pupienus and Balbinus defeated Maximinus, mainly due to the defection of several legions , namely the Parthica II who assassinated Maximinus. But their joint reign was doomed from the start with popular riots, military discontent and even an enormous fire that consumed Rome in June 238. Pupienus and Balbinus were killed by the Praetorian guard and Gordian proclaimed sole emperor. Due to Gordian’s age, the imperial government was surrendered to the aristocratic families, who controlled the affairs of Rome through the senate. In 240, Sabinianus revolted in the African province, but the situation was dealt quickly. In 241, Gordian was married to Furia Sabinia Tranquillina , daughter of the newly appointed praetorian prefect, Timesitheus. As chief of the Praetorian guard and father in law of the emperor, Timesitheus quickly became the de facto ruler of the Roman empire. In the 3rd century, the Roman frontiers weakened against the Germanic tribes across the Rhine and Danube , and the Sassanid kingdom across the Euphrates increased its own attacks. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia , the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a huge army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243). The campaign was a success and Gordian, who had joined the army, was planning an invasion of the enemy’s territory, when his father-in-law died in unclear circumstances. Without Timesitheus, the campaign, and the emperor’s security, were at risk. Marcus Julius Philippus, also known as Philip the Arab , stepped in at this moment as the new Praetorian Prefect and the campaign proceeded. In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. Roman sources do not mention this battle and suggest that Gordian died far away, upstream of the Euphrates. Although ancient sources often described Philip, who succeeded Gordian as emperor, as having murdered Gordian at Zaitha (Qalat es Salihiyah), the cause of Gordian’s death is unknown. Gordian’s youth and good nature, along with the deaths of his grandfather and uncle and his own tragic fate at the hands of another usurper, granted him the everlasting esteem of the Romans. Despite the opposition of the new emperor, Gordian was deified by the Senate after his death, in order to appease the population and avoid riots. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be quite happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. The item “GORDIAN III 238AD Ancient Roman Coin Hadrianopolis SERAPIS Cult TEMPLE i22245″ is in sale since Thursday, August 18, 2011. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Provincial (100-400 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Aug 1 2017

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

On the obverse side: Crude bust of Julia Domna. On the reverse side: Four Vestal Virgins sacrificing over an altar, before the Temple of Vesta. This coin is in good condition. All my artifacts are ancient as described, and guaranteed authentic. Don’t forget to check out my other auctions for more great deals on Ancient Jewelry. The item “Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA” is in sale since Monday, July 31, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “fn7″ and is located in Hot Springs, Montana. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ancient Coins: Roman Coins
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman

Jul 30 2017

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma good

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma good

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma good

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma good

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma good

On the obverse side: Bust of Maxentius. On the reverse side: Roma (city goddess of Rome) seated in a temple with six columns. This coin is in good condition with beautiful patina. Measures 23.5 mm in length. Reference: RIC Aquileia 121, Van Meter 18. All my artifacts are ancient as described, and guaranteed authentic. Don’t forget to check out my other auctions for more great deals on Ancient Jewelry. The item “RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma good” is in sale since Saturday, July 29, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “fn7″ and is located in Hot Springs, Montana. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Maxentius
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Ancient Coins: Roman Coins
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman

Jul 29 2017

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma vg

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma vg

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma vg

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma vg

RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma vg

On the obverse side: Bust of Maxentius. On the reverse side: Roma (city goddess of Rome) seated in a temple with six columns. This coin is in very good condition with beautiful patina. Measures 24 mm in length. All my artifacts are ancient as described, and guaranteed authentic. Don’t forget to check out my other auctions for more great deals on Ancient Jewelry. The item “RARE Ancient ROMAN COIN temple MAXENTIUS 306 AD-312AD old Rome goddess Roma vg” is in sale since Saturday, July 29, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “fn7″ and is located in Hot Springs, Montana. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Maxentius
  • Ancient Coins: Roman Coins
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Composition: Bronze

Jul 1 2017

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA

On the obverse side: Crude bust of Julia Domna. On the reverse side: Four Vestal Virgins sacrificing over an altar, before the Temple of Vesta. This coin is in good condition. All my artifacts are ancient as described, and guaranteed authentic. Don’t forget to check out my other auctions for more great deals on Ancient Jewelry. The item “Ancient ROMAN COIN Vestal Virgins sacrificing altar Temple of Vesta JULIA DOMNA” is in sale since Friday, June 30, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “fn7″ and is located in Hot Springs, Montana. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ancient Coins: Roman Coins
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman

Jun 12 2017

HADRIAN as Olympian GOD, Temple of DIANA, Gilt Gold Ancient Roman Large 32mm COIN

HADRIAN as Olympian GOD, Temple of DIANA, Gilt Gold Ancient Roman Large 32mm COIN

HADRIAN as Olympian GOD, Temple of DIANA, Gilt Gold Ancient Roman Large 32mm COIN

HADRIAN as Olympian GOD, Temple of DIANA, Gilt Gold Ancient Roman Large 32mm COIN

H A D R I A N. Traces of GOLD gilding. Obverse: APIANOC · KAICAP · OYMIOC, laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right, aegis on far shoulder. Reverse: Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia facing within octastyle temple; in pediment, statuary group. Acroteria on edge of roof. The light gilding on this specimen, suggests that this was perhaps a medallic or commemorative issue, possibly struck on the occasion of Hadrians visit to Ephesos in AD 129 An interesting coin depicting Hadrian as an Olympian deity. The emperor Hadrian was granted many honorific titles by the Greeks, including “Savior”, “Founder, ” “New Dionysus, ” “New Heracles, ” “Panhellenius, ” and “Savior of the World, ” but the epithet “Olympius” is perhaps the most presumptuous. During Hadrians visits to Athens early in AD 129, he visited the massive Temple of Zeus Olympius (also known as the Olympeion). During one of Hadrians visits to Athens, early in A. 129, the inner shrine of the massive Temple of Zeus Olympius (much of which survives today) was ready for the emperor’s dedication. The Historia Augusta reports that at this time Hadrian also dedicated an altar to himself, by virtue of which he seems to have elected himself a god, and to have invested himself with the powers of the Olympian Zeus (the Greek equivalent of the Roman Jupiter Optimus Maximus). The Greeks were long accustomed to their kings claiming divine association during their lifetimes, and in Imperial times the Greeks had long worshiped Roman emperors as gods, beginning with Augustus. The Athenians were not as enthusiastic about Hadrians self-proclamation as the Asiatic Greeks proved to be, and they would go no further than to acknowledge his title Olympius, to liken him to Pericles, the Athenian statesman of old who also had received the title Olympius, and to name one of their tribes after him. The Ephesians, who hosted Hadrian after he left Athens in the spring of 129 AD, however, took his declaration of divinity in stride, as is shown by an inscription found at Ephesus on which his divine title is acknowledged. Further, the Ephesians struck bronzes (such as the one offered here) and silver cistophori that equated Hadrian with Zeus Olympius Metcalf, The Cistophori of Hadrian, nos. Hadrians elevated spiritual status may also be reflected on cistophori that seem to depict Hadrian in a reborn state after his participation in the Eleusinian Mysteries for a discussion, see Metcalf, pp. SNG Copenhagen 387 var. Al legends reverse of coin on ours. SNG Munich 126 var. Price & Trell 379, fig. Dark olive patina with some. Good Fine / Very Fine. All illustrations are of the actual item offered. The authenticity of all pieces is fully guaranteed. Images are not actual size. Please see description for actual measurements. The item “HADRIAN as Olympian GOD, Temple of DIANA, Gilt Gold Ancient Roman Large 32mm COIN” is in sale since Sunday, June 11, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Provincial (100-400 AD)”. The seller is “zeus_gallery” and is located in Beverly Hills, California. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Date: 129 AD
  • Denomination: Æ32 Medallion
  • Mint: IONIA. Ephesus
  • Ruler: Hadrian

Jun 7 2017

RARE NGC AU TEMPLE of Diva FAUSTINA Ancient Roman Enoure Silver Denarius Coin

RARE NGC AU TEMPLE of Diva FAUSTINA Ancient Roman Enoure Silver Denarius Coin

RARE NGC AU TEMPLE of Diva FAUSTINA Ancient Roman Enoure Silver Denarius Coin

RARE NGC AU TEMPLE of Diva FAUSTINA Ancient Roman Enoure Silver Denarius Coin

RARE NGC AU TEMPLE of Diva FAUSTINA Ancient Roman Enoure Silver Denarius Coin

D I V A F A U S T I N A Died 140/141 AD. SCARCE Struck 147-161 AD. Obverse: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right of the deified Empress. Reverse: AED DIV FAVSTINAE (“To the monument of the divine Faustina”), Hexastyle (six column portico) Temple of Diva Faustina with balustrade, seated figure of the deifed empress in the central intercolumnium. Temple features triangular pediment, two winged Victories acroteria at corners and surmounted by a quadriga at the peak. SCARCE VERY HIGH GRADE ANCIENT Ref. RIC III 343 (Pius); BMCRE 339 (Pius); RSC 1. Ancient Roman Imperial Silver Coinage of Diva Faustina Struck by Antoninus Pius. D I V A F A U S T I N A. Wife of Antoninus Pius. Reverse: AED DIV FAVSTINAE. “To the monument of the divine Faustina”. , Hexastyle (six column portico) Temple of Diva Faustina with balustrade, seated figure of the deifed empress in the central intercolumnium. Had a small temple built on the Sacred Way (Sacra Via). On the Forum Romanum, just east of the Basilica Aemilia. Overlooking the Forum as a monument to his deceased wife. Its construction began in 142, but the temple seems to have been completed only after 150. After the death of Antoninus in 161, Marcus Aurelius consecrated the monument to his two adoptive parents/in-laws. Today, the remains of the temple monument are included in the church of San Lorenzo de Miranda. SCARCE VERY HIGH GRADE ANCIENT. NGC Certified, Encapsulated and Graded AU (About Uncirculated). Holder notes “scratch” but I fail to see it! All illustrations are of the actual item offered. The authenticity of all pieces is fully guaranteed. The item “RARE NGC AU TEMPLE of Diva FAUSTINA Ancient Roman Enoure Silver Denarius Coin” is in sale since Tuesday, June 06, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “zeus_gallery” and is located in Beverly Hills, California. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Grade: AU
  • Ruler: Faustina I
  • Date: 147
  • Composition: Silver
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Type: Denarius
  • Material: Silver

Apr 2 2017

DOMITIAN in front of TEMPLE Saecular Games 88AD Rome Ancient Roman Coin NGC AU

DOMITIAN in front of TEMPLE Saecular Games 88AD Rome Ancient Roman Coin NGC AU

DOMITIAN in front of TEMPLE Saecular Games 88AD Rome Ancient Roman Coin NGC AU

DOMITIAN in front of TEMPLE Saecular Games 88AD Rome Ancient Roman Coin NGC AU

DOMITIAN in front of TEMPLE Saecular Games 88AD Rome Ancient Roman Coin NGC AU

[6475] Domitian – Roman Caesar: 69-81 A. Bronze As 27mm (12.91 grams) Rome mint: 14 Sep – 31 Dec, 88 AD Reference: RIC 623 Certification: NGC Ancients AU Strike: 4/5 Surface: 3/5 IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P, laureate head right. COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC, Domitian standing left sacrificing from patera over altar, with hexastyle temple in background, two attendants playing harp & pan pipes to left, SC in ex. In 88 AD, Domitian initiated the Saecular Games (LVDI SAECVLVM), a celebration to mark the commencement of a new age, or Saeculum. The games were first celebrated in either 348 or 249 BC and were supposed to be held every 100 to 105 years; however, after 146 BC the schedule was thrown off track by civil wars and disruptions, and the next Saeculum was not celebrated until Augustus did so in 17 BC. Claudius, using the earlier formula, celebrated a new set in 47 AD, but Domitian dated his Saeculum from the Augustan games 105 years previous. The reverse of this handsome coins shows Domitian opening the games with a sacrifice before the Temple of Jupiter Stator, attended by two flute-playing musicians. Provided with certificate of authenticity. CERTIFIED AUTHENTIC by Sergey Nechayev, PhD – Numismatic Expert. Titus Flavius Caesar Domitianus Augustus. 24 October 51 18 September 96 was Roman Emperor. From 81 to 96. Domitian was the third and last emperor of the Flavian dynasty. Domitian’s youth and early career were largely spent in the shadow of his brother Titus. Who gained military renown during the First Jewish-Roman War. This situation continued under the rule of his father Vespasian. Who became emperor in 69 following the civil war. Known as the Year of the Four Emperors. While Titus held a great many offices under the rule of his father, Domitian was left with honours but no responsibilities. Vespasian died in 79 and was succeeded by Titus, whose own reign came to an unexpected end when he was struck by a fatal illness in 81. The following day Domitian was declared Emperor by the Praetorian Guard. Commencing a reign which lasted fifteen years longer than any man who had ruled since Tiberius. As Emperor, Domitian strengthened the economy by revaluing the Roman coinage. Expanded the border defenses of the Empire, and initiated a massive building program to restore the damaged city of Rome. Significant wars were fought in Britain, where his general Agricola. Attempted to conquer Caledonia. Where Domitian was unable to procure a decisive victory against king Decebalus. Domitian’s government exhibited totalitarian. Characteristics; he saw himself as the new Augustus. An enlightened despot destined to guide the Roman Empire into a new era of brilliance. Religious, military, and cultural propaganda. Fostered a cult of personality. And by nominating himself perpetual censor. He sought to control public and private morals. As a consequence, Domitian was popular with the people and army but considered a tyrant by members of the Roman Senate. He was the first Roman Emperor who had demanded to be addressed as dominus et deus (master and god). Domitian’s reign came to an end in 96 when he was assassinated by court officials. The same day he was succeeded by his advisor Nerva. After his death, Domitian’s memory was condemned to oblivion. By the Roman Senate, while senatorial authors such as Tacitus. Published histories propagating the view of Domitian as a cruel and paranoid tyrant. Modern history has rejected these views, instead characterising Domitian as a ruthless but efficient autocrat, whose cultural, economic and political program provided the foundation of the peaceful 2nd century. The item “DOMITIAN in front of TEMPLE Saecular Games 88AD Rome Ancient Roman Coin NGC AU” is in sale since Sunday, April 02, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “victoram” and is located in Forest Hills, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Domitian
  • Certification: NGC
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman
  • Certification Number: 4529184-006
  • Grade: AU

Feb 17 2017

PROBUS 280AD Authentic Rare Ancient Roman Coin Temple of Roma or Venus i59170

PROBUS 280AD Authentic Rare Ancient Roman Coin Temple of Roma or Venus i59170

PROBUS 280AD Authentic Rare Ancient Roman Coin Temple of Roma or Venus i59170

Authentic Ancient Coin of. Silvered Bronze Antoninianus 22mm (3.42 grams) Rome mint 280 A. Reference: RIC 185h, C 531 IMPPROBVSAVG – Radiate bust left, wearing imperial mantle, holding scepter with eagle atop. ROMAEAETER Exe: R (crescent) – Temple with six columns; Roma seated within. The Temple of Venus and Roma in Latin. Templum Veneris et Romae is thought to have been the largest temple. Located on the Velian Hill. Between the eastern edge of the Forum Romanum. It was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix. (“Venus the Bringer of Good Fortune”) and Roma Aeterna. The architect was the emperor. And construction began in 121. It was officially inaugurated by Hadrian in 135, and finished in 141 under Antoninus Pius. Damaged by fire in 307. It was restored with alterations by the emperor Maxentius. In order to build the temple, erected on the remnants of the porticoed vestibule to Emperor Nero. The Colossus of Nero. Was moved and placed near the amphitheatre. Which shortly afterwards became known as the Colosseum. Unimpressed by his emperor’s architectural skills, Hadrian. S most brilliant architect, Apollodorus. Made a scornful remark on the size of the seated statues within the cellae, saying that they would surely hurt their heads if they tried to stand up from their thrones. Apollodorus was banished and executed not long after this. According to the ancient historian Ammianus Marcellinus the temple was among the great buildings of Rome which astonished the Emperor Constantius II on his visit to the city in 357. Further restoration was performed under Eugenius. (392394) against Theodosius I. Whose policy was the restoration of Pagan cults and temples. However as with many of Rome’s majestic ancient buildings the temple was later targeted for its rich materials. In 630 Pope Honorius I with the consent of the Emperor Heraclius, removed the gilt-bronze tiles from the roof of the temple for the adornment of St. Temple of Venus and Roma seen from the Colosseum. A severe earthquake at the beginning of the 9th century is believed to have destroyed the temple. Around 850 Pope Leo IV. Ordered the building of a new church, Santa Maria Nova. On the ruins of the temple. After a major rebuilding in 1612, this church was renamed Santa Francesca Romana, incorporating Roma’s cella as the belltower. The vast quantity of marble that once adorned the temple has all but disappeared due to its use as a raw material for building projects from the Middle Ages onwards. The Italian archaeologist Rodolfo Amedeo Lanciani makes reference to his discovery of a lime kiln in close proximity to the temple in his work The Destruction of Ancient Rome. Presently only a few columns surrounding remain standing in their original positions, while others that have gone missing have been replaced by buxus. 308 – 310 AD. This coin is commemorating the reconstruction of the temple of Roma following the fire in 307 AD. On the ground is depicted on the reverse. Set on a platform. Measuring 145 metres (476 ft) in length and 100 metres (328 ft) in width, and stood 29.5 metres (97 ft) tall, being 31 metres (102 ft) counting the statues, the peristyle. (also peripteral) building measured 110 metres (361 ft) in length and 53 metres (174 ft) in width. The temple itself consisted of two main chambers cellae. , each housing a cult statue of a god Venus. The goddess of love, and Roma. The goddess of Rome. Both figures seated on a throne. The cellae were arranged symmetrically back-to-back. Roma’s cella faced west, looking out over the Forum Romanum, and Venus’ cella faced east, looking out over the Colosseum. A row of four columns. Lined the entrance to each cella, and the temple was bordered by colonnaded. Entrances ending in staircases that led down to the Colosseum. The west and east sides of the temple (the short sides) had ten white columns decastyle. , and the south and north (the long sides) featured eighteen white columns. All of these columns measured 1.8 metres (6 ft) in width, making the temple very imposing. A reconstruction of the temple interior by German Architect Josef Bühlmann from 1913 depicts two longitudinal colonnades of Corinthian. Columns forming a central nave. Flanked by two aisles. Resting on the columns a double impost forms a double entablature. Extending back into the exedra. With a cofferred half- dome. Ceiling above the seated statue. The walls behind the aisles are inset with smaller columns standing some distance above the floor on a plinth. Small statues set in niches. Between these columns punctuate the walls, the niches surmounted by alternating arched. More small statues are positioned on the entablature. Above each small column. As an additional clever subtlety by Hadrian, Venus also represented love (Amor in Latin), and “AMOR” is “ROMA” spelled backwards. Thus, placing the two divinities of Venus and Rome back-to-back in a single temple created a further symmetry with the back-to-back symmetry of their names as well. Within Venus’ cella was another altar where newly wed couples could make sacrifices. Directly adjacent to this altar stood gigantic silver statues of Marcus Aurelius. And Faustina the Younger. Canopy erected at the Temple of Venus and Rome during Good Friday ceremonies. Since the papacy of John Paul II, the heights of the temple and its position opposite the main entrance to the Colosseum have been used to good effect as a public address platform. This may be seen in the photograph below where a red canopy has been erected to shelter the Pope as well as an illuminated cross, on the occasion of the Good Friday. The Pope, either personally or through a representative, leads the faithful through meditations on the stations of the cross while a cross is carried from there to the Colosseum. The Temple has now been reopened. To the public after an extensive restoration programme that lasted 26 years. Access to the temple is included in tickets for the Colosseum, the Forum and the Palatine Hill. Marcus Aurelius Probus Augustus. 19 August 232 September/October 282, was Roman Emperor. From 276 to 282. During his reign, the Rhine. Frontier was strengthened after successful wars against several Germanic tribes. Such as the Goths. And much of the Limes Germanicus. Were officially abandoned during his reign, with the Romans withdrawing to the Rhine. Born in 232 in Sirmium. Modern day Sremska Mitrovica. The son of Dalmatius. Probus entered the army around 250 upon reaching adulthood. Appointed as a military tribune. By the emperor Valerian. He later distinguished himself under the emperors Aurelian. He was appointed governor of the East by Tacitus, whose death in 276 prompted Probus’ soldiers to proclaim him emperor. The half-brother of Tacitus, was also proclaimed successor by his soldiers, but he was killed after an indecisive campaign. Probus travelled west, defeating the Goths along the lower Danube in 277, and acquiring the title of Gothicus. His position as emperor was ratified by the Senate. Sculpted head of Probus from Brescia. In 278, Probus campaigned successfully in Gaul. Both tribes had advanced through the Neckar. Valley and across the Rhine into Roman territory. Meanwhile, his generals defeated the Franks. And these operations were directed to clearing Gaul. Of Germanic invaders Franks. , allowing Probus to adopt the titles of Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus. One of his principles was never to allow the soldiers to be idle, and to employ them in time of peace on useful works, such as the planting of vineyards in Gaul, Pannonia and other districts, in order to restart the economy in these devastated lands. Of a greater and more lasting significance, Probus began the strategy of settling the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces of the empire. In 279280, Probus was, according to Zosimus. Where he fought the Vandals. In the same years, Probus’ generals defeated the Blemmyes. Probus then ordered the reconstruction of bridges and canals along the Nile, where the production of grain for the Empire was centered. In 280281, Probus put down three usurpers, Julius Saturninus. The extent of these revolts is not clear, but there are clues that they were not just local problems (an inscription with the name of Probus erased has been found as far as Spain). In 281, the emperor was in Rome, where he celebrated his triumph. Probus was eager to start his eastern campaign, delayed by the revolts in the west. He left Rome in 282, travelling first towards Sirmium, his birth city. Different accounts of Probus’s death exist. According to Joannes Zonaras. The commander of the Praetorian Guard. Had been proclaimed, more or less unwillingly, emperor by his troops. Probus sent some troops against the new usurper, but when those troops changed sides and supported Carus, Probus’ remaining soldiers assassinated him at Sirmium (September/October 282). According to other sources, however, Probus was killed by disgruntled soldiers, who rebelled against his orders to be employed for civic purposes, like draining marshes. Carus was proclaimed emperor after Probus’ death and avenged the murder of his predecessor. World-renowned expert numismatist, enthusiast, author and dealer in authentic ancient Greek, ancient Roman, ancient Byzantine, world coins & more. Ilya Zlobin is an independent individual who has a passion for coin collecting, research and understanding the importance of the historical context and significance all coins and objects represent. Send me a message about this and I can update your invoice should you want this method. Getting your order to you, quickly and securely is a top priority and is taken seriously here. Great care is taken in packaging and mailing every item securely and quickly. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be very happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Additionally, the coin is inside it’s own protective coin flip (holder), with a 2×2 inch description of the coin matching the individual number on the COA. Whether your goal is to collect or give the item as a gift, coins presented like this could be more prized and valued higher than items that were not given such care and attention to. Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens sometimes that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for their order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. How and where do I learn more about collecting ancient coins? Visit the “Guide on How to Use My Store”. For on an overview about using my store, with additional information and links to all other parts of my store which may include educational information on topics you are looking for. You may also want to do a YouTube search for the term “ancient coin collecting” for educational videos on this topic. The item “PROBUS 280AD Authentic Rare Ancient Roman Coin Temple of Roma or Venus i59170″ is in sale since Thursday, February 16, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Probus

Jan 26 2017

JULIA DOMNA 193AD Vestal Virgin Priestesses at Temple RARE Ancient Roman Coin

JULIA DOMNA 193AD Vestal Virgin Priestesses at Temple RARE Ancient Roman Coin

JULIA DOMNA 193AD Vestal Virgin Priestesses at Temple RARE Ancient Roman Coin

[6296] Julia Domna (Wife of Septimius Severus) JULIA DOMNA (WIFE OF SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS). AE As (11.16 gms), A. NGC AU, Strike: 5/5 Surface: 3/5. “IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG” Draped bust of Julia Domna right; Reverse: “VESTA” Four Vestals sacrificing in front of Temple of Vesta, “S – C” in exergue. Light smoothing, dark green patina, well struck with a crisp portrait. Provided with certificate of authenticity. CERTIFIED AUTHENTIC by Sergey Nechayev, PhD – Numismatic Expert. Persephone used to live far away from the other gods, a goddess within Nature herself before the days of planting seeds and nurturing plants. In the Olympian telling, the gods Hermes. Had wooed Persephone; but Demeter rejected all their gifts and hid her daughter away from the company of the Olympian gods. The story of her abduction by Hades. Against her will is traditionally referred to as the Rape of Persephone. It is mentioned briefly in Hesiod. And told in considerable detail in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter. It is said, permitted Hades. Who was in love with the beautiful Persephone, to carry her off as her mother Demeter. Was not likely to allow her daughter to go down to Hades. Persephone was gathering flowers with the Oceanids. The Homeric Hymn saysin a field when Hades. Came to abduct her, bursting through a cleft in the earth. When she found her daughter had disappeared, searched for her all over the earth with Hecate’s torches. In most versions she forbids the earth to produce, or she neglects the earth and in the depth of her despair she causes nothing to grow. The sun, who sees everything, eventually told Demeter what had happened and at length she discovered the place of her abode. Finally, Zeus, pressed by the cries of the hungry people and by the other deities who also heard their anguish, forced Hades. Indeed complied with the request, but first he tricked her, giving her some pomegranate. Persephone was released by Hermes. Who had been sent to retrieve her, but because she had tasted food in the underworld, she was obliged to spend a third of each year (the winter months) there, and the remaining part of the year with the gods above. With the later writers Ovid and Hyginus, Persephone’s time in the underworld becomes half the year. Various local traditions place Persephone’s abduction in a different location. Among whom her worship was probably introduced by the Corinthian and Megarian colonists, believed that Hades found her in the meadows near Enna. And that a well arose on the spot where he descended with her into the lower world. Thought that their own island had been the scene of the rape, and the Eleusinians. Mentioned the Nysian plain in Boeotia, and said that Persephone had descended with Hades into the lower world at the entrance of the western Oceanus. Later accounts place the rape in Attica. The return of Persephone , by Frederic Leighton. Hymn mentions the Nysion (or Mysion) which was probably a mythical place. The location of this mythical place may simply be a convention to show that a magically distant chthonic. Land of myth was intended in the remote past. Before Persephone was abducted by Hades, the shepherd Eumolpus and the swineherd Eubuleus. Saw a girl in a black chariot driven by an invisible driver being carried off into the earth which had violently opened up. Eubuleus was feeding his pigs at the opening to the underworld when Persephone was abducted by Plouton. His swine were swallowed by the earth along with her, and the myth is an etiology for the relation of pigs with the ancient rites in Thesmophoria. Demeter as she has been promised established her mysteries (orgies) when the Eleusinians built for her a temple near the spring of Callichorus. These were awful mysteries which were not allowed to be uttered. The uninitiated would spend a miserable existence in the gloomy space of Hades. In some versions, Ascalaphus. Informed the other deities that Persephone had eaten the pomegranate seeds. This is an origin story. To explain the seasons. In an earlier version, Hecate. On an Attic red-figured. 440 BC in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Persephone is rising as if up stairs from a cleft in the earth, while Hermes stands aside; Hecate, holding two torches, looks back as she leads her to the enthroned Demeter. Introduces a goddess of a blessed afterlife. Assured to Orphic mystery. Is asserted to be the daughter of Hades, but no mother is mentioned. The item “JULIA DOMNA 193AD Vestal Virgin Priestesses at Temple RARE Ancient Roman Coin” is in sale since Wednesday, January 25, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “victoram” and is located in Forest Hills, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Julia Domna