Dec 3 2017

1 NGC SLABBED ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE as in the Bible

1 NGC SLABBED ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE as in the Bible

1 NGC SLABBED ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE as in the Bible

1 NGC SLABBED ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE as in the Bible

1 NGC SLABBED ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE as in the Bible

Photos an example of the coin you will receive in same grade. WOW – CHECK OUT THE DETAIL IN THESE ANCIENT COINS. THIS IS FOR 1 – NGC SLABBED AND CERTIFIED COIN. IN A BEAUTIFUL MAHOGANY LIKE DISPLAY BOX. OVER 2,000 YEARS AGO. BETTER GRADE PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE. STORY CARD AND A. Widow’s Mite in a BETTER GRADE (see photos and you decide the grade). I also have the smaller Judaea. Widow’s Mite for sale. The original Greek language used the word lepton. These “MITES” were the smallest and lowest denomination coin that circulated in. Jerusalem during Christs lifetime. Most were thin and were carelessly and crudely struck, usually off center and in small flans. Legends are generally unreadable. The mite was the lowest Denomation coin in history. It is about 1/128 of a Denarius, and a Denarius was a day’s pay for a common laborer. So if a laborer was paid 1 days wages with the Widows Mite, they would have to give them 128 Mites!! The value of the coins were based on combined weight with other coins and not on an individual coin value. Both the lepton and the prutah had the images of the anchor on one side and the star or wheel image on the other. COIN AS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE. THE WIDOWS MITE 103-76BC. BASILEWS ALEXANDROU (King Alexander) around anchor. Eight ray star (or wheel) surrounded by diadem, Hebrew inscription Yehonatan the king between the rays. This coin is not a replica, but an actual bronze coin, certified genuine, minted in the Holy Land over 2000 years ago during the reign of King Alexander Jannaeus in the century preceding the birth of Jesus. What makes these coins of great historical and religious importance is that twice in the Bible, Jesus is quoted as telling the story of the poor widow who gave all that she had which was just two mites. The coin enclosed is identical to the type of coin she would have had. These coins have been known to collectors for hundreds of years as Widows Mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. And he called unto him, his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, This poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury; For all they did cast in of their abundance, but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. And he looked up, and saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury. And he saw also a certain poor widow casting in thither two mites. And he said, Of a truth I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all: For all these have their abundance cast in unto the offerings of God: but she of her penury hath cast in all the living that she had. Although it is common to view in museums, it is a rare opportunity to actually hold an object of this age and importance in your hands. These coins typically circulated for very long periods and most specimens became. It is because of the discovery of. An ancient hoard that a limited number of coins of this superb level of preservation are available. This Widows Mite coin is a genuine bronze coin issued by King Alexander Jannaeus, the Great Grand Nephew of Judah Macabee and the Jewish leader of the Holy Land from 103-76 B. It is this type of coin that circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. The two dominant symbols that are found on the coin are an anchor and a star with 8 rays. Occasionally Greek lettering is seen on these coins around the anchor illustrating the prevalence of Greek cultural influence that was evident during Jannaeus reign. Judean coins were made by striking long, thin strips of blank metal between two dies. The first coin on the strip was then placed between the two striking dies and hit with a hammer. The strip was then quickly pulled until the next coin was in place and the process repeated. When the strip was completed the coins were cut apart. The Widows Mite Biblical coin refers to the story of the poor widow whom Jesus Christ commended in the Temple for having given all she had, two mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two Mites… And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: for all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all she had. THERE IS ALSO MENTION OF THE WIDOWS MITE IN. There are 2 different Widows Mites. Lepton Widows Mite 103-76 BC (Widows Mite lepton as mentioned in scriptures) minted under Alexander Jannaeus. Prutah Widows Mite 103-76 BC Often currently referred to as the Widows Mite but was a larger coin with similar markings to the lepton minted under Alexander Jannaeus. These coins were minted by the Maccabees in Jerusalem and used in Jerusalem during the life of Jesus and the disciples. It was the penny of that time period and is famously mentioned in the New Testament. There are no two coins of this kind alike! They were minted by hand over 2000 years ago and were in circulation for many years, causing many Pruta and Lepton coins that are found today to be in poor condition. The Famous “Widow’s Mite”, Judean bronze Prutah of King Janeaus, minted 103-76 BC. Mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… (or Parable) of the widow’s mite. Is a story present in the. Is teaching at the. The Gospel of Mark specifies that a mite was worth less than a. The smallest Roman coin, implying that Mark’s intended audience were more familiar with Roman culture than with Jewish. The Story of the Widow’s Mites. As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. “Truly I tell you, ” he said, this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on. The Christian lesson of the widow’s mites, as relayed in. Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44). Is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites to her name, and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. (Mites were ancient pennies, fairly worthless at the time). Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God — she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things (food, clothes, all material needs) will be added unto you. This Widows Mite bronze Prutah was issued by Hasmonean King of Judea, Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC). It circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. Similar coins are still today being discovered at excavations in the Holy Land. The two symbols found on the coin are an anchor within a circle, representing a diadem, and an 8 pointed star. These symbols are derived from earlier Greek coin designs that were used in the area. When these coins were originally made, they were very crudely struck. Most examples show odd shapes and off-center, partial images. They were the lowest value coins of the period. I have several Biblical Widow’s Mite Coins in albums and loose. The free listing tool. The item “1 NGC SLABBED ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE as in the Bible” is in sale since Monday, October 24, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “californiacoolcoins4u” and is located in US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Grade: does not apply
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Date: 103 – 76 BC
  • Certification: NGC

Aug 19 2017

Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Medium Quality

Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Medium Quality

Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Medium Quality

Widow’s Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic. The Widow’s Mite 2000 year old coin. The Famous Widow’s Mite, Judean bronze lepton of King Janeaus, minted ca. Mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… Coin comes in plastic slab certified as authentic from NGC. They are hand struck and crudely made. Often the image will be off center. This adds to the historical interest of the piece! Twice in the Gospels, in Luke and Mark, we hear the Parable of the Widows Mitesa tale of charity and humility told by Jesus in the last days of His life. After three years of itinerant preaching in the lesser cities of Galilee and Judea, Jesus has brought His Ministry to the City of David. Once arrived in Jerusalem, the hub of Jewish life and the capital of the Roman province of Palestine, there will be no turning back. In a weeks time, He will be crucified. Jesus is preaching in the Temple, which represents both the citys religious center and its business district. Jesus watches rich men in flowing gowns put pieces of silver into the treasurygenerous offerings to the Temple. Then he watches a woman, a certain widow, deposit two mites into the till. He observes that this poor widow has put in more than all those who have given to the treasury; for they all put in out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all that she had, her whole livelihood. The parable, repeated in Luke 21:1-4, is understood to both extol the virtues of charity and impugn the vices of avarice. As Jesus remarks in Matthew 19:24, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. Mite is the 1611 King James translation for the Greek , or lepton. The widows mites mentioned in the Scriptures are thought to have be either leptons or perhaps similar, slightly larger variations called prutahs. These tiny bronze coins were the smallest and lowest denominations that circulated throughout the Holy Land during the lifetime of Jesus Christ. The most common of these types were struck during the reign of Alexander Jannaeus, one of the last Jewish kings before the Roman annexation of Judaea. Most leptons and prutahs were very crudely made, usually off center on irregular flans. The resulting coins frequently show minimal imagery. Both the leptons and prutahs are called star-anchor types; one or both sides will often show partial images of an anchor and/or a six or eight-pointed star. The anchor design was adopted from the Seleucids, who used it to symbolize their naval power. The star, with or without a surrounding circular diadem, symbolizes Heaven. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Medium Quality” is in sale since Tuesday, March 21, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “airaco-inc” and is located in Milford, Michigan. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC

Aug 19 2017

Widows Mite Ancient Coin Certified Authentic with Deluxe Portfolio

Widows Mite Ancient Coin Certified Authentic with Deluxe Portfolio

Widows Mite Ancient Coin Certified Authentic with Deluxe Portfolio

BRONZE WIDOWS MITE Ancient Coin Certified Authentic. AS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE. OVER 2,000 YEARS AGO. These “MITES” were the smallest and lowest denomination coin that circulated in. Jerusalem during Christs lifetime. Most were thin and were carelessly and crudely hand struck, usually off center and in small flans. Legends are generally unreadable. The mite was the lowest Denomation coin in history. It is about 1/128 of a Denarius, and a Denarius was a day’s pay for a common laborer. So if a laborer was paid 1 days wages with the Widows Mite, they would have to give them 128 Mites!! This is an authentic Widow’s Mite, Judean bronze lepton of King Janeaus, minted ca. It is mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… This high grade coin comes in an information folder with certification of authenticity. Check out the full story of these amazing pieces of history below. Coin quality does vary from the image. These coins were hand struck, so it’s very unlikely to see two that are the same. Please see the group of coins in the photo for an idea of what your coin could look like. Twice in the Gospels, in Luke and Mark, we hear the Parable of the Widows Mitesa tale of charity and humility told by Jesus in the last days of His life. After three years of itinerant preaching in the lesser cities of Galilee and Judea, Jesus has brought His Ministry to the City of David. Once arrived in Jerusalem, the hub of Jewish life and the capital of the Roman province of Palestine, there will be no turning back. In a weeks time, He will be crucified. Jesus is preaching in the Temple, which represents both the citys religious center and its business district. Jesus watches rich men in flowing gowns put pieces of silver into the treasurygenerous offerings to the Temple. Then he watches a woman, a certain widow, deposit two mites into the till. He observes that this poor widow has put in more than all those who have given to the treasury; for they all put in out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all that she had, her whole livelihood. The parable, repeated in Luke 21:1-4, is understood to both extol the virtues of charity and impugn the vices of avarice. As Jesus remarks in Matthew 19:24, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. Mite is the 1611 King James translation for the Greek , or lepton. The widows mites mentioned in the Scriptures are thought to have be either leptons or perhaps similar, slightly larger variations called prutahs. These tiny bronze coins were the smallest and lowest denominations that circulated throughout the Holy Land during the lifetime of Jesus Christ. The most common of these types were struck during the reign of Alexander Jannaeus, one of the last Jewish kings before the Roman annexation of Judaea. Most leptons and prutahs were very crudely made, usually off center on irregular flans. The resulting coins frequently show minimal imagery. Both the leptons and prutahs are called star-anchor types; one or both sides will often show partial images of an anchor and/or a six or eight-pointed star. The anchor design was adopted from the Seleucids, who used it to symbolize their naval power. The star, with or without a surrounding circular diadem, symbolizes Heaven. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “Widows Mite Ancient Coin Certified Authentic with Deluxe Portfolio” is in sale since Wednesday, January 15, 2014. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “airaco-inc” and is located in Holt, Michigan. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Aug 19 2017

Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Grade A

Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Grade A

Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Grade A

Widow’s Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic. The Widow’s Mite 2000 year old coin. The Famous Widow’s Mite, Judean bronze lepton of King Janeaus, minted ca. Mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… Coin comes in plastic slab certified as authentic from NGC. They are hand struck and crudely made. Often the image will be off center. This adds to the historical interest of the piece! Twice in the Gospels, in Luke and Mark, we hear the Parable of the Widows Mitesa tale of charity and humility told by Jesus in the last days of His life. After three years of itinerant preaching in the lesser cities of Galilee and Judea, Jesus has brought His Ministry to the City of David. Once arrived in Jerusalem, the hub of Jewish life and the capital of the Roman province of Palestine, there will be no turning back. In a weeks time, He will be crucified. Jesus is preaching in the Temple, which represents both the citys religious center and its business district. Jesus watches rich men in flowing gowns put pieces of silver into the treasurygenerous offerings to the Temple. Then he watches a woman, a certain widow, deposit two mites into the till. He observes that this poor widow has put in more than all those who have given to the treasury; for they all put in out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all that she had, her whole livelihood. The parable, repeated in Luke 21:1-4, is understood to both extol the virtues of charity and impugn the vices of avarice. As Jesus remarks in Matthew 19:24, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. Mite is the 1611 King James translation for the Greek , or lepton. The widows mites mentioned in the Scriptures are thought to have be either leptons or perhaps similar, slightly larger variations called prutahs. These tiny bronze coins were the smallest and lowest denominations that circulated throughout the Holy Land during the lifetime of Jesus Christ. The most common of these types were struck during the reign of Alexander Jannaeus, one of the last Jewish kings before the Roman annexation of Judaea. Most leptons and prutahs were very crudely made, usually off center on irregular flans. The resulting coins frequently show minimal imagery. Both the leptons and prutahs are called star-anchor types; one or both sides will often show partial images of an anchor and/or a six or eight-pointed star. The anchor design was adopted from the Seleucids, who used it to symbolize their naval power. The star, with or without a surrounding circular diadem, symbolizes Heaven. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “Widows Mite Ancient Coin NGC Certified Authentic Grade A” is in sale since Tuesday, March 21, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “airaco-inc” and is located in Milford, Michigan. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: NGC

Aug 19 2017

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

Photos are the coin you will receive. WOW – CHECK OUT THE DETAIL IN THIS ANCIENT COIN. THIS IS FOR 1 COIN IN A NICE CLEAR DISPLAY BOX. OVER 2,000 YEARS AGO. HIGH GRADE PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE. STORY CARD AND A. Widow’s Mite in a HIGH GRADE (see photos and you decide the grade). I also have the smaller Judaea. Widow’s Mite for sale. The original Greek language used the word lepton. These “MITES” were the smallest and lowest denomination coin that circulated in. Jerusalem during Christs lifetime. Most were thin and were carelessly and crudely struck, usually off center and in small flans. Legends are generally unreadable. The mite was the lowest Denomation coin in history. It is about 1/128 of a Denarius, and a Denarius was a day’s pay for a common laborer. So if a laborer was paid 1 days wages with the Widows Mite, they would have to give them 128 Mites!! The value of the coins were based on combined weight with other coins and not on an individual coin value. Both the lepton and the prutah had the images of the anchor on one side and the star or wheel image on the other. COIN AS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE. THE WIDOWS MITE 103-76BC. BASILEWS ALEXANDROU (King Alexander) around anchor. Eight ray star (or wheel) surrounded by diadem, Hebrew inscription Yehonatan the king between the rays. This coin is not a replica, but an actual bronze coin, certified genuine, minted in the Holy Land over 2000 years ago during the reign of King Alexander Jannaeus in the century preceding the birth of Jesus. What makes these coins of great historical and religious importance is that twice in the Bible, Jesus is quoted as telling the story of the poor widow who gave all that she had which was just two mites. The coin enclosed is identical to the type of coin she would have had. These coins have been known to collectors for hundreds of years as Widows Mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. And he called unto him, his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, This poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury; For all they did cast in of their abundance, but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. And he looked up, and saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury. And he saw also a certain poor widow casting in thither two mites. And he said, Of a truth I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all: For all these have their abundance cast in unto the offerings of God: but she of her penury hath cast in all the living that she had. Although it is common to view in museums, it is a rare opportunity to actually hold an object of this age and importance in your hands. These coins typically circulated for very long periods and most specimens became. It is because of the discovery of. An ancient hoard that a limited number of coins of this superb level of preservation are available. This Widows Mite coin is a genuine bronze coin issued by King Alexander Jannaeus, the Great Grand Nephew of Judah Macabee and the Jewish leader of the Holy Land from 103-76 B. It is this type of coin that circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. The two dominant symbols that are found on the coin are an anchor and a star with 8 rays. Occasionally Greek lettering is seen on these coins around the anchor illustrating the prevalence of Greek cultural influence that was evident during Jannaeus reign. Judean coins were made by striking long, thin strips of blank metal between two dies. The first coin on the strip was then placed between the two striking dies and hit with a hammer. The strip was then quickly pulled until the next coin was in place and the process repeated. When the strip was completed the coins were cut apart. The Widows Mite Biblical coin refers to the story of the poor widow whom Jesus Christ commended in the Temple for having given all she had, two mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two Mites… And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: for all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all she had. THERE IS ALSO MENTION OF THE WIDOWS MITE IN. There are 2 different Widows Mites. Lepton Widows Mite 103-76 BC (Widows Mite lepton as mentioned in scriptures) minted under Alexander Jannaeus. Prutah Widows Mite 103-76 BC Often currently referred to as the Widows Mite but was a larger coin with similar markings to the lepton minted under Alexander Jannaeus. These coins were minted by the Maccabees in Jerusalem and used in Jerusalem during the life of Jesus and the disciples. It was the penny of that time period and is famously mentioned in the New Testament. There are no two coins of this kind alike! They were minted by hand over 2000 years ago and were in circulation for many years, causing many Pruta and Lepton coins that are found today to be in poor condition. The Famous “Widow’s Mite”, Judean bronze Prutah of King Janeaus, minted 103-76 BC. Mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… (or Parable) of the widow’s mite. Is a story present in the. Is teaching at the. The Gospel of Mark specifies that a mite was worth less than a. The smallest Roman coin, implying that Mark’s intended audience were more familiar with Roman culture than with Jewish. The Story of the Widow’s Mites. As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. “Truly I tell you, ” he said, this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on. The Christian lesson of the widow’s mites, as relayed in. Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44). Is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites to her name, and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. (Mites were ancient pennies, fairly worthless at the time). Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God — she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things (food, clothes, all material needs) will be added unto you. This Widows Mite bronze Prutah was issued by Hasmonean King of Judea, Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC). It circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. Similar coins are still today being discovered at excavations in the Holy Land. The two symbols found on the coin are an anchor within a circle, representing a diadem, and an 8 pointed star. These symbols are derived from earlier Greek coin designs that were used in the area. When these coins were originally made, they were very crudely struck. Most examples show odd shapes and off-center, partial images. They were the lowest value coins of the period. I have several Biblical Widow’s Mite Coins in albums and loose. The free listing tool. The item “1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA” is in sale since Saturday, December 03, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “californiacoolcoins4u” and is located in US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Grade: does not apply
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Date: 103 – 76 BC
  • Certification: NGC

Aug 19 2017

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

Photos are the coin you will receive. WOW – CHECK OUT THE DETAIL IN THIS ANCIENT COIN. THIS IS FOR 1 COIN IN A NICE CLEAR DISPLAY BOX. OVER 2,000 YEARS AGO. HIGH GRADE PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE. STORY CARD AND A. Widow’s Mite in a HIGH GRADE (see photos and you decide the grade). I also have the smaller Judaea. Widow’s Mite for sale. The original Greek language used the word lepton. These “MITES” were the smallest and lowest denomination coin that circulated in. Jerusalem during Christs lifetime. Most were thin and were carelessly and crudely struck, usually off center and in small flans. Legends are generally unreadable. The mite was the lowest Denomation coin in history. It is about 1/128 of a Denarius, and a Denarius was a day’s pay for a common laborer. So if a laborer was paid 1 days wages with the Widows Mite, they would have to give them 128 Mites!! The value of the coins were based on combined weight with other coins and not on an individual coin value. Both the lepton and the prutah had the images of the anchor on one side and the star or wheel image on the other. COIN AS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE. THE WIDOWS MITE 103-76BC. BASILEWS ALEXANDROU (King Alexander) around anchor. Eight ray star (or wheel) surrounded by diadem, Hebrew inscription Yehonatan the king between the rays. This coin is not a replica, but an actual bronze coin, certified genuine, minted in the Holy Land over 2000 years ago during the reign of King Alexander Jannaeus in the century preceding the birth of Jesus. What makes these coins of great historical and religious importance is that twice in the Bible, Jesus is quoted as telling the story of the poor widow who gave all that she had which was just two mites. The coin enclosed is identical to the type of coin she would have had. These coins have been known to collectors for hundreds of years as Widows Mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. And he called unto him, his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, This poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury; For all they did cast in of their abundance, but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. And he looked up, and saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury. And he saw also a certain poor widow casting in thither two mites. And he said, Of a truth I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all: For all these have their abundance cast in unto the offerings of God: but she of her penury hath cast in all the living that she had. Although it is common to view in museums, it is a rare opportunity to actually hold an object of this age and importance in your hands. These coins typically circulated for very long periods and most specimens became. It is because of the discovery of. An ancient hoard that a limited number of coins of this superb level of preservation are available. This Widows Mite coin is a genuine bronze coin issued by King Alexander Jannaeus, the Great Grand Nephew of Judah Macabee and the Jewish leader of the Holy Land from 103-76 B. It is this type of coin that circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. The two dominant symbols that are found on the coin are an anchor and a star with 8 rays. Occasionally Greek lettering is seen on these coins around the anchor illustrating the prevalence of Greek cultural influence that was evident during Jannaeus reign. Judean coins were made by striking long, thin strips of blank metal between two dies. The first coin on the strip was then placed between the two striking dies and hit with a hammer. The strip was then quickly pulled until the next coin was in place and the process repeated. When the strip was completed the coins were cut apart. The Widows Mite Biblical coin refers to the story of the poor widow whom Jesus Christ commended in the Temple for having given all she had, two mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two Mites… And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: for all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all she had. THERE IS ALSO MENTION OF THE WIDOWS MITE IN. There are 2 different Widows Mites. Lepton Widows Mite 103-76 BC (Widows Mite lepton as mentioned in scriptures) minted under Alexander Jannaeus. Prutah Widows Mite 103-76 BC Often currently referred to as the Widows Mite but was a larger coin with similar markings to the lepton minted under Alexander Jannaeus. These coins were minted by the Maccabees in Jerusalem and used in Jerusalem during the life of Jesus and the disciples. It was the penny of that time period and is famously mentioned in the New Testament. There are no two coins of this kind alike! They were minted by hand over 2000 years ago and were in circulation for many years, causing many Pruta and Lepton coins that are found today to be in poor condition. The Famous “Widow’s Mite”, Judean bronze Prutah of King Janeaus, minted 103-76 BC. Mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… (or Parable) of the widow’s mite. Is a story present in the. Is teaching at the. The Gospel of Mark specifies that a mite was worth less than a. The smallest Roman coin, implying that Mark’s intended audience were more familiar with Roman culture than with Jewish. The Story of the Widow’s Mites. As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. “Truly I tell you, ” he said, this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on. The Christian lesson of the widow’s mites, as relayed in. Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44). Is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites to her name, and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. (Mites were ancient pennies, fairly worthless at the time). Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God — she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things (food, clothes, all material needs) will be added unto you. This Widows Mite bronze Prutah was issued by Hasmonean King of Judea, Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC). It circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. Similar coins are still today being discovered at excavations in the Holy Land. The two symbols found on the coin are an anchor within a circle, representing a diadem, and an 8 pointed star. These symbols are derived from earlier Greek coin designs that were used in the area. When these coins were originally made, they were very crudely struck. Most examples show odd shapes and off-center, partial images. They were the lowest value coins of the period. I have several Biblical Widow’s Mite Coins in albums and loose. The free listing tool. The item “1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA” is in sale since Saturday, December 03, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “californiacoolcoins4u” and is located in US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Grade: does not apply
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Date: 103 – 76 BC
  • Certification: NGC

Aug 19 2017

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA

Photos are the coin you will receive. WOW – CHECK OUT THE DETAIL IN THIS ANCIENT COIN. THIS IS FOR 1 COIN IN A NICE CLEAR DISPLAY BOX. OVER 2,000 YEARS AGO. HIGH GRADE PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE. STORY CARD AND A. Widow’s Mite in a HIGH GRADE (see photos and you decide the grade). I also have the smaller Judaea. Widow’s Mite for sale. The original Greek language used the word lepton. These “MITES” were the smallest and lowest denomination coin that circulated in. Jerusalem during Christs lifetime. Most were thin and were carelessly and crudely struck, usually off center and in small flans. Legends are generally unreadable. The mite was the lowest Denomation coin in history. It is about 1/128 of a Denarius, and a Denarius was a day’s pay for a common laborer. So if a laborer was paid 1 days wages with the Widows Mite, they would have to give them 128 Mites!! The value of the coins were based on combined weight with other coins and not on an individual coin value. Both the lepton and the prutah had the images of the anchor on one side and the star or wheel image on the other. COIN AS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE. THE WIDOWS MITE 103-76BC. BASILEWS ALEXANDROU (King Alexander) around anchor. Eight ray star (or wheel) surrounded by diadem, Hebrew inscription Yehonatan the king between the rays. This coin is not a replica, but an actual bronze coin, certified genuine, minted in the Holy Land over 2000 years ago during the reign of King Alexander Jannaeus in the century preceding the birth of Jesus. What makes these coins of great historical and religious importance is that twice in the Bible, Jesus is quoted as telling the story of the poor widow who gave all that she had which was just two mites. The coin enclosed is identical to the type of coin she would have had. These coins have been known to collectors for hundreds of years as Widows Mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. And he called unto him, his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, This poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury; For all they did cast in of their abundance, but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. And he looked up, and saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury. And he saw also a certain poor widow casting in thither two mites. And he said, Of a truth I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all: For all these have their abundance cast in unto the offerings of God: but she of her penury hath cast in all the living that she had. Although it is common to view in museums, it is a rare opportunity to actually hold an object of this age and importance in your hands. These coins typically circulated for very long periods and most specimens became. It is because of the discovery of. An ancient hoard that a limited number of coins of this superb level of preservation are available. This Widows Mite coin is a genuine bronze coin issued by King Alexander Jannaeus, the Great Grand Nephew of Judah Macabee and the Jewish leader of the Holy Land from 103-76 B. It is this type of coin that circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. The two dominant symbols that are found on the coin are an anchor and a star with 8 rays. Occasionally Greek lettering is seen on these coins around the anchor illustrating the prevalence of Greek cultural influence that was evident during Jannaeus reign. Judean coins were made by striking long, thin strips of blank metal between two dies. The first coin on the strip was then placed between the two striking dies and hit with a hammer. The strip was then quickly pulled until the next coin was in place and the process repeated. When the strip was completed the coins were cut apart. The Widows Mite Biblical coin refers to the story of the poor widow whom Jesus Christ commended in the Temple for having given all she had, two mites. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two Mites… And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: for all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all she had. THERE IS ALSO MENTION OF THE WIDOWS MITE IN. There are 2 different Widows Mites. Lepton Widows Mite 103-76 BC (Widows Mite lepton as mentioned in scriptures) minted under Alexander Jannaeus. Prutah Widows Mite 103-76 BC Often currently referred to as the Widows Mite but was a larger coin with similar markings to the lepton minted under Alexander Jannaeus. These coins were minted by the Maccabees in Jerusalem and used in Jerusalem during the life of Jesus and the disciples. It was the penny of that time period and is famously mentioned in the New Testament. There are no two coins of this kind alike! They were minted by hand over 2000 years ago and were in circulation for many years, causing many Pruta and Lepton coins that are found today to be in poor condition. The Famous “Widow’s Mite”, Judean bronze Prutah of King Janeaus, minted 103-76 BC. Mentioned in New Testament books, Mark and Luke, in the famous parable about a poor widow praised by Jesus for her charitable contribution of two mites… (or Parable) of the widow’s mite. Is a story present in the. Is teaching at the. The Gospel of Mark specifies that a mite was worth less than a. The smallest Roman coin, implying that Mark’s intended audience were more familiar with Roman culture than with Jewish. The Story of the Widow’s Mites. As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. “Truly I tell you, ” he said, this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on. The Christian lesson of the widow’s mites, as relayed in. Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44). Is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites to her name, and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. (Mites were ancient pennies, fairly worthless at the time). Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God — she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things (food, clothes, all material needs) will be added unto you. This Widows Mite bronze Prutah was issued by Hasmonean King of Judea, Alexander Jannaeus (103-76BC). It circulated in the Holy Land during Jesus life. Similar coins are still today being discovered at excavations in the Holy Land. The two symbols found on the coin are an anchor within a circle, representing a diadem, and an 8 pointed star. These symbols are derived from earlier Greek coin designs that were used in the area. When these coins were originally made, they were very crudely struck. Most examples show odd shapes and off-center, partial images. They were the lowest value coins of the period. I have several Biblical Widow’s Mite Coins in albums and loose. The free listing tool. The item “1 NGC ANCIENT ROMAN COIN PRUTAH WIDOWS MITE in the Bible in Display with COA” is in sale since Saturday, December 03, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “californiacoolcoins4u” and is located in US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Grade: does not apply
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Date: 103 – 76 BC
  • Certification: NGC

Jul 26 2017

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow’s Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow's Mite Anchor++

Collection of 12 Ancient Coins!! Many others in excellent condition. Can not show images of all coins but photos show list of coins included in set. Please send message if you have questions about listing. The item “Collection of 12 Ancient Coins! Siglo, Alex III Drachma, Widow’s Mite Anchor++” is in sale since Tuesday, July 25, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “mullencoins” and is located in Ada, Michigan. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Grade: Ungraded
  • Certification: Uncertified
  • Composition: Bronze
  • Cleaned/Uncleaned: Uncleaned

Jun 4 2017

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Mixed Lot includes 50 Widows Mite Sized Romans c. 50 Constantine Era Roman Empire c. 50 Ancient Greek Bronze c. 25 New World Pirate Era Spanish Bronze Coins. Over 280,000+ positive feedbacks and over 178,000 repeat customers! Don’t wait until it’s too late! WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON GETTING A 5 STAR FEEDBACK. WE WILL BE HAPPY TO SPEAK WITH YOU. THANK YOU FOR YOUR BUSINESS. West Saint Paul, MN 55118. FREE image editing and power uploading with Vendio Image Hosting. Vendio Sales Manager: Easy, Fast and Powerful for all Sellers. The item “Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate” is in sale since Monday, May 29, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Other Ancient Coins”. The seller is “estatebureau” and is located in Saint Paul, Minnesota. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Cleaned/Uncleaned: Cleaned
  • Provenance: Greek, Roman, Widows Mite Sized Roman, Pirate

May 23 2017

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate

Mixed Lot includes 50 Widows Mite Sized Romans c. 50 Constantine Era Roman Empire c. 50 Ancient Greek Bronze c. 25 New World Pirate Era Spanish Bronze Coins. Over 280,000+ positive feedbacks and over 178,000 repeat customers! Don’t wait until it’s too late! WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON GETTING A 5 STAR FEEDBACK. WE WILL BE HAPPY TO SPEAK WITH YOU. THANK YOU FOR YOUR BUSINESS. West Saint Paul, MN 55118. FREE image editing and power uploading with Vendio Image Hosting. Vendio Sales Manager: Easy, Fast and Powerful for all Sellers. The item “Group Lot of 175 Slabbed Ancient Coins- Roman, Widows Mite Sized, Greek & Pirate” is in sale since Tuesday, May 16, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Other Ancient Coins”. The seller is “estatebureau” and is located in Saint Paul, Minnesota. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Cleaned/Uncleaned: Cleaned
  • Provenance: Greek, Roman, Widows Mite Sized Roman, Pirate